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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
there. and the story is basically this, folks. it's in the journal, which is that part of obama care allows caps on precipitation drug spending, and some unions, apparently, are just realizing this. and they're pushing back on the administration to make sure they don't have these caps, because they're saying, that's going to drive up our medical costs, our health care costs, more than we thought, which means, we're going to be less competitive in the marketplace. so according to the journal, the unions are pushing back on the obama administration about this cap. and they're asking for federal subsidies on top of their work insurance. >> all right. and let's talk about facebook now. they've just had a brutal year. but some pretty good news in the fourth quarter. >> hey, the stock is up 70%, 7-0, since september, joe. mobile ad revenue is up. that's what everyone wants to see. 70% the stock is up since september. mobile ad revenue up 23%, which is accelerating. look around the table, okay. mika with her iphone, iphone -- >> soon to be samsung. >> barnicle, you've got an abacus, i've go
't touch. this political negligence suggests that obama has chosen to ignore negative budget projections, credit downgrades, falling revenues and perpetual increases in mandatory spending. instead, the president is teeing up partisan legislative battles with republicans in hopes of -- but as a measurement of the president's seriousness, his second inaugural address can only be seen as a grand failure that missed yet another historic opportunity to call americans together in the name of shared sacrifice. and richard haass, there is another opportunity, which would be the state of the union which i'm sort of banking on. >> traditionally inaugurals are the poetry, and then the state of the union becomes the prose. and the president did not prepare for educate the american people about some of the tough decisions to come, particularly on medicare and medicaid. so the real question going forward for the state of the union is whether he essentially addresses that. and whether he -- because we've still got more than, i think, more than $2 trillion in serious cuts to be made to entitlements over
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)